Menu

Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models

Most books about cloud computing are either extremely high-level quasi-marketing tomes (sometimes written by cloud vendors) about the myriad benefits of the cloud without any understanding of how to practically implement the technology under discussion.  The other type of cloud books are highly technical references guides, that provide technical details, but for a limited audience. 

In Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models, author Michael Kavis has written perhaps the most honest book about the cloud available to date.  Make no doubt about it; Kavis is a huge fan of the cloud.  But more importantly, he knows what the limits of the cloud are, and how cloud computing is not a panacea.   That type of candor makes this book an invaluable guide to anyone looking to understand how to effective deploy cloud technologies. 

c1

The book is an excellent balance of the almost boundless potential of cloud computing, mixed with a high amount of caution that the potential of the cloud can only be manifest with effective requirements and formal security architecture.

One of the mistakes of using the cloud is that far too many decision makers rush in, without understanding the significant differences (and they are significant) between the 3 main cloud service models. 

In chapter 1, he provides a number of enthusiastic cloud success stories to set the stage.  He shows how a firm was able to build a solution entirely on the public cloud with a limited budget.  He also showcases Netflix, whose infrastructure is built on Amazon Web Services (AWS). 

Chapter 3 is titled cloud computing worst practices and the book would be worth purchasing for this chapter alone.  The author has a number of cloud horror stories and shows the reader how they can avoid failure when moving to the cloud.  While many cloud success stories showcase applications developed specifically for the cloud, the chapter details the significant challenges of migrating existing and legacy applications to the cloud.  Such migrations are not easy endeavors, which he makes very clear.

In the chapter, Kavis details one of the biggest misguided perceptions of cloud computing, in that it will greatly reduce the cost of doing business.  That is true for some cloud initiatives, but definitely not all, as some cloud marketing people may have you believe.

Perhaps the most important message of the chapter is that not every problem is one that needs to be solved by cloud computing.  He cites a few examples where not going with a cloud solution was actually cheaper in the long run.

The book does a very good job of delineating the differences between the various types of cloud architectures and service models.  He notes that one reason for leveraging IaaS over PaaS, is that when a PaaS provider has an outage, the customer can only wait for the provider to fix the issue and get the services back online.  With IaaS, the customer can architect for failure and build redundant services across multiple physical or virtual data centers.

For many CIO’s, the security fears of the cloud means that they will immediately write-off any consideration of cloud computing.  In chapter 9, the author notes that almost any security regulation or standard can be met in the cloud.  As none of the regulations and standard dictate where the data must specifically reside.

The book notes that for security to work in the cloud, firm’s needs to apply 3 key strategies for managing security in cloud-based applications, namely centralization, standardization and automation. 

In chapter 10, the book deals with creating a centralized logging strategy.  Given that logging is a critical component of any cloud-based application; logging is one of the areas that many firms don’t adequate address in their move to the cloud.  The book provides a number of approaches to use to create an effective logging strategy.

The only significant issue I have with the book is that while the author is a big fan of Representational state transfer (REST), many firms have struggled to obtain the benefits he describes.  RESTful is an abstraction of the architecture of the web; namely an architectural style consisting of a coordinated set of architectural constraints applied to components, connectors and data elements, within a distributed hypermedia system. REST ignores the details of component implementation and protocol syntax in order to focus on the roles of components, the constraints upon their interaction with other components, and their interpretation of significant data elements. 

I think the author places too much reliance on RESTful web services and doesn’t detail the challenges in making it work properly. RESTful is not always the right choice even though it is all the rage in some cloud design circle. 

While the book is part of the Wiley CIO Series, cloud architects, software and security engineers, technical managers and anyone with an interest in the cloud  will find this an extremely valuable resource. 

Ironically, for those that are looking for ammunition why the cloud is a terrible idea, they will find plenty of evidence for it in the book.  But the reasons are predominantly that those that have failed in the cloud, didn’t know why they were there in the first place, or were clueless on how to use the cloud. 

For those that want to do the cloud right, the book provides a vendor neutral approach and gives the reader an extremely strong foundation on which to build their cloud architecture.

The book lists the key challenges that you will face in the migration to the cloud, and details how most of those challenges can be overcome. The author is sincere when he notes areas where the cloud won’t work. 

For those that want an effective roadmap to get to the cloud, and one that provides essential information on the topic, Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models is a book that will certainly meet their needs.

 

978-1118617618

← View more Blogs

This document was retrieved from https://www.rsaconference.com/blogs/architecting-the-cloud-design-decisions-for-cloud-computing-service-models on Sun, 25 Sep 2016 13:24:53 -0400.
© 2016 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.