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Showing Blog Posts: 1–10 of 13 tagged IT

  • Security Innovation is Live and Well, With Plenty of Room for More

    by Fahmida Y. Rashid on March 24, 2015

    Is innovation in information security dead? It's easy to think so when each day there is a new headline about yet another massive organization's data breach, or a new report points out that enterprises aren't taking care of the security basics. All while cyber-attackers are gleefully scooping up our private data and looting our bank accounts. These breaches aren't happening because organizations…

  • We Welcome Our New Automation Overlords

    by Securosis Team on February 5, 2015

    This post is by Rich Mogull, analyst and CEO of Securosis, an independent security research firm. I am inherently lazy. If I can come up with some new, automated way to solve a problem and save some time, I'll spend many hours more than it would take to knock it out manually on the off chance of some future time savings. But I understand I'm a bit unusual that way (and it is sometimes to my…

  • Getting the InfoSec Budget You Need

    by Fahmida Y. Rashid on October 1, 2014

    There is a tongue-in-cheek saying that goes something like this: How do security professionals get the security budget they want? Wait for a data breach. It's a sad state of affairs that there is a grain of truth to this poor joke. This month, we explore how security professionals can tackle budget planning for next year. Security spending as a percentage of the overall IT budget has remained…

  • Security Metrics: How Are You Measuring Security?

    by Joshua Marpet on August 12, 2014

    Do you have an information security practice? How do you measure its effectiveness? By the number of tickets generated? The number of viruses found and stamped out? Or by how quiet it is?—"If they don't bother me, they must be doing their job!" Have the security metrics guidelines changed in the last few years as infosec moved away from a helpdesk mentality, towards a penetration tester's…

  • Given a Choice, Users Still Prefer 'Classic' Graphical User Interfaces

    by Robert Moskowitz on June 27, 2014

    A survey of Linux users shows that attempts to improve upon early, well-designed user interfaces are falling flat on their faces. Users like what they have right now on their computer screens and don't want any so-called "improvements" that force them to do, among other things, more clicking. These early graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are not easily defined. However, they generally include a…

  • Security Decisions: Changing the Way We Buy Security in the Enterprise

    by John Linkous on June 20, 2014

    When you hear the words "security product procurement," what's the first thing that pops into your head? Many enterprise customers who make security decisions for evaluating and purchasing technology often first think of the competitive landscape: How does one vendor's product compare to another? While this approach has been used since the dawn of commercial security products, there's a better…

  • New Report Shows Retailers Slow to Make Use of Social Commerce Big Data

    by Robert Moskowitz on June 5, 2014

    The third annual Social Commerce IQ (SCIQ) report, based on survey results from 872 retailers regarding data from seven popular social platforms, shows that retailers have been slow to take advantage of the opportunities available to them in data from online consumers on brand awareness, traffic, and social CRM. The new report, prepared by social discovery pioneer 8thBridge, reflects the volume of…

  • Data Classification: The Elephant in the File Server

    by Joshua Marpet on May 7, 2014

    You know the common thought process: "Data classification is a planning thing. It's an operations thing. It's a disaster-recovery thing. But it can't be this department's thing. Nope. Not doing it. It's too hard. Takes too long. Wastes manpower. Why is it done, anyway? Nobody cares about it." The amount of data created and collected every year is huge. Enough of it is generated every day to fill…

  • Windows XP: The COBOL of the 21st Century

    by Joshua Marpet on April 21, 2014

    What happened when Windows XP went into end of life (EOL)? That fateful day happened on April 8, 2014. It doesn't mean that WinXP computers will suddenly stop working. It doesn't mean that the world of WinXP computing will end. To be honest, it probably doesn't even mean that WinXP-based programming will end. So what does it actually mean? New drivers won't be developed. It will get increasingly…

  • The Phoenix Project

    by Ben Rothke on February 28, 2013

    While at the RSA Conference this week, the nice people at Tripwire gave me a copy of their CTO’s book The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win. The theme of the book is that Bill is an IT manager at Parts Unlimited. The company's new IT initiative, code named Phoenix Project, is critical to the future of Parts Unlimited, but the project is massively over budget…

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