Blogs

Showing Blog Posts: 11–20 of 101 tagged Data Breach

  • Greatly Reduce Data Theft by Knowing the Who and Where of Your Data

    by Christopher Burgess on May 9, 2014

    The universal constant of every business, regardless of size or industry, is that it has important data, and that data may be the target for theft. What should be the second constant is knowledge of where the data is located. Once you know its location, you can sort out who has access. This sounds simple, yet so many companies are unable to say with certainty where their data is, who has access…

  • BYOD Is Alive and Growing in APAC

    by Christopher Burgess on May 5, 2014

    Bring your own device (BYOD) adoption in APAC is alive and well, and is expected to increase by more than 20 percent from 2014 to 2020, according to a study by Grand View Research. Two driving factors for this growth are reduced hardware costs and the maturation of cloud-based solutions, and the devices of choice are smartphones and tablets. What's in it for the businesses? A report from…

  • When Intellectual Property Goes Out the Front Door

    by Christopher Burgess on May 1, 2014

    According to a 2012 survey by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) referenced in The Asahi Shimbun, it was revealed that of the 3,000 Japanese companies polled, 13.5 percent have had their intellectual property (IP) leaked or have suspected a leak over the past five years. The Asahi Shimbun goes on to describe how IP is being stolen by a variety of entities, both foreign and…

  • Windows XP: The COBOL of the 21st Century

    by Joshua Marpet on April 21, 2014

    What happened when Windows XP went into end of life (EOL)? That fateful day happened on April 8, 2014. It doesn't mean that WinXP computers will suddenly stop working. It doesn't mean that the world of WinXP computing will end. To be honest, it probably doesn't even mean that WinXP-based programming will end. So what does it actually mean? New drivers won't be developed. It will get increasingly…

  • Privacy in the Age of Ubiquitous Computer Vision

    by Joshua Marpet on April 17, 2014

    With Google Glass, cell phone cameras, hidden cameras, and ever cheaper surveillance cameras, can there truly be user privacy? With Google Glass and facial recognition apps, tagging people can happen at full walking speed, without a pause or possibility of the action being recognized. Is there any parallel in other realms? At one point, a car with an expired registration would only get exposed…

  • Protect Against Internal Data Security Threats: Specific Strategies and Techniques

    by Robert Moskowitz on March 18, 2014

    Everyone's worried about anonymous hackers, but the smartest IT Security teams also keep a sharp eye out for internal data security threats such as leaks from disgruntled employees, paid spies, or even trusted workers who are susceptible to human error. While you cannot guarantee total information security, at any price, there are some cost-effective strategies and techniques to cut down on the…

  • Another (Almost) Target Lesson: Securing Control System Networks to Protect the Enterprise Side Works Too

    by Gib Sorebo on February 10, 2014

    In this column and elsewhere, we’ve seen plenty of exhortations to make sure that control system networks are sufficiently isolated from corporate networks so as to prevent infiltrations from finding their way to the more sensitive and “more important” parts of the organization. For those delivering electricity, pumping oil, or whipping up batches of hazardous chemicals, it is critical that…

  • Information Sharing Post-Snowden, What Changes?

    by Kathleen Moriarty on February 5, 2014

    For this second piece in the series, I’d like to highlight the use of threat modeling to determine the best options to exchange intelligence on the wire. There is no single answer as to how we address the challenges we now face as security professionals with the stream of revelations post-Snowden. We need to determine what is the balance for protecting a nation versus the need for tighter…

  • What the Target Breach Teaches Us About Standards, Regulations, and Critical Infrastructure

    by Gib Sorebo on January 30, 2014

    The recently disclosed security breach of Target’s® point of sale terminals and related infrastructure is likely a lesson on the limitations of standards and regulations to adequately protect sensitive information and critical systems despite the political piling on that traditionally visits a high-profile data breach. However, absent some newly discovered evidence of incompetence, the Target…

  • Data Leakage: The Human End-Around to DLP

    by Christopher Burgess on January 28, 2014

    The old adages "still water finds its own level" and "moving water finds a path of least resistance" both have applicability when we think of data leakage and employees' engagement with data loss prevention (DLP) processes, policies, procedures, and software. With still water, data is at rest; with moving water, your data in transit. There are also two types of employees: Those who are trying to…

This document was retrieved from http://www.rsaconference.com/blogs on Sat, 30 Aug 2014 08:12:41 -0400.
© 2014 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.